How to Engage on Twitter: Opinions

This article will show you how to engage on one specific tweet category called ‘Opinions’.

It is part of our series of 8 articles ‘how to engage on twitter’ covering the following 8 categories of tweets: OpinionEmotionAuthored ContentListLocal NewsEndorsementQuestion & RequestEvent.

As you try to build relations with new affluents, you may notice that these people frequently communicate their opinion as they tweet. Most noteworthy, opinions are great opportunities to engage on a very personal level.


B
elow is a breakdown of different opinion-centric types we’ve encountered:

 

  • A tweet without a link that self-contains an opinion. It may be framed as a question in which  a person asks his/her audience to chime in 
  • A tweet in which a person states an opinion about content in a link added to the tweet
  • A tweet that reinforces how a prospect feels/think about content found in link in tweet

Here are the different tactics to use to engage on an opinion type of tweet.

1) A self-contained opinion


A self-contained opinion is very personal. It’s a strong viewpoint aimed at agreeing/disagreeing about something, communicating a belief/observation/lesson, making deductions (if this, then that) or reinforcing others’ opinions through a RT or a mention of the (Love this!!! RT OR @zyx).

Therefore, the options to engage are:

  • Agreeing or challenging the opinion (especially if it was worded as a question)
  • Probing a bit more to gather more information on where the opinion comes from. Consider asking a question: why do you think…?, ask for data points or real life experience.
  • Adding to the person’s opinion by sharing relevant data points, personal lessons and experience

2) An opinion about content in a link    

Often, people tweet their 2 cents about a piece of content that sparked their interest. It’s a way to share their opinion with their audience by reinforcing with the thoughts expressed in a linked piece of content (Love this!!! xyz…).

The tactics described above still apply but, this time, you can also leverage any thoughts/datapoint/opinions expressed in the tweeted article to chime in on the person’s opinion.

 

Photo by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash

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